Water security

Water security

Improved water security and sound environmental management

Groundwater represents 17% of available fresh water in Australia and is essential for communities, agriculture and industry, especially in regional and remote areas.

    Our work supports

    • Improved water security for households, agriculture and industry.

    • Sound environmental management and stewardship.

    Featured work

    Acquifer

    Managed aquifer recharge prospectivity mapping in the Northern Territory arid zone using remotely sensed data

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) enhances recharge to aquifers. As part of the Exploring for the Future Southern Stuart Corridor project, remotely sensed data were used to map regolith materials and landforms, and to identify areas that represent potential MAR target areas for future investigation. 

    Managed aquifer recharge prospectivity mapping in the Northern Territory arid zone using remotely sensed data Read the extended abstract
    Image of water tank in a dry golden landscape

    National Groundwater Systems

    This project is improving understanding of Australia’s groundwater resources to better support responsible groundwater management and secure groundwater resources into the future.

    National Groundwater Systems Read about the project
    Broken Hill NSW, Australia

    Upper Darling River floodplain groundwater study

    Communities, industries and the environment in the upper Darling River region have been impacted by recent droughts and floods. During periods of low flow in the Darling River, groundwater has the potential to be an alternative water source for towns, agriculture and mining.

    Upper Darling River floodplain groundwater study Read about the study
    Groundwater

    Regional hydrogeological characterisation of the McBride and Nulla basalt provinces: Upper Burdekin region, North Queensland

    This report presents key results of groundwater level interpretations from the Upper Burdekin Groundwater Project in North Queensland, conducted as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF)—an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia.

    Regional hydrogeological characterisation of the McBride and Nulla basalt provinces: Upper Burdekin region, North Queensland Access the record
    groundwater tap

    How geoscience can improve water resilience for regional communities

    In central Australia, groundwater is often the only source of water for communities, agriculture and industry. As part of the Exploring for the Future program (2016-20), Geoscience Australia undertook geoscientific and hydrogeological investigations in the Southern Stuart Corridor to better understand groundwater aquifers. 

    How geoscience can improve water resilience for regional communities Read the case study

    Other impact areas

    Installing solar panels

    Informed decisions

    Effective evidence-based decision-making between landholders, traditional owners, public, government and industry.

    Informed decisions Learn more
    Electric vehicle

    Sustainability

    Increased sustainability unperpinned by thriving low emissions energy and improved responsible management of natural resources and the environment. 

    Sustainability Learn more
    Alice Springs

    Prosperity

    Growing economic prosperity and social well-being through resource development, investment in resource exploration, new job creation and responsible agricultural planning. 

    Prosperity Learn more
    Outback rural landscape with red earth, dry rivers and green trees, Australia, aerial view

    Understanding what lies beneath

    The Australian Government’s Exploring for the Future program, led by Geoscience Australia, is dedicated to supporting a strong economy, resilient society and sustainable environment for the benefit of Australians through an integrated geoscientific understanding of our mineral, energy and groundwater resource potential.

    Launched in 2016, the first 4 years of the program (2016–20) initially focused on northern Australia. Based on the program’s success it was extended (2020–24) and expanded across the whole of Australia.

    Drawing together data, science and innovative techniques and technology, the program enables us to map undercover and underexplored areas. This in turn encourages new investment in ‘greenfield’ areas by providing security and certainty to our minerals, energy and agriculture sectors as we transition towards a sustainable, low-emissions future.

    The evidence gathered through the program is already translating into real impacts, providing industry and communities with vital information they need to confidently plan, make better informed decisions and invest in new developments.

    The Exploring for the Future impact pathway summarises how the program will realise its vision.